The CART datamodel

Well, my back problems made me think a lot about the CART system that I’ve mentioned before. And it made me consider how I need to handle the difference between plain data and the relationship between the objects. Because the most troubling thing I had to deal with was that I did not want to change my datamodel for every new item that I want to store. So it made me think…

The CART system is mostly created to handle relationships between items, transactions and contracts. It’s not about handling of the data itself. Actually, the system doesn’t even care about the data. All that matters are the relationships. Data is just something to display to the user, something to store but normally not something that you’ll need to process very often at the data layer. So, considering the fact that you can serialize objects in .NET to XML data, I’ve decided to support a basic structure for my Garage Sale project for all the items, transactions and contracts. And each of them will contain a Data property that has the serialized data, that I could convert to data objects and back again.

This idea makes it also more clear where the templates are within my system. My templates are these object definitions! I will have a very generic database with a very simple layout, and I can generate a very complex business layer around this all that I can change as often as I like without the need to change my database model. As a result, I might never have to change the data model again!

Of course it will have a drawback, since the database will contain serialized objects. If I change those objects, I will also need to keep track of the changes in those stored structures and either update them or keep up multiple versions of those objects. Updating those structures would mean that I have to create update apps that know both the old structures and the new structures. It should then convert each old structure to a new structure. Maintaining multiple versions might be more practical since that would leave all old data intact in your system. Anyways, it’s some added complexity that I’ll have to consider.

But now, my datamodel as created by Visual Studio 2012 by using the Entity Framework:EF-CART


So, what do you see?

  • The DataObject is the base class for any CART object. It has a unique identifier, a name that can be used to show the related object and a Data property that will contain an object as XML.
  • DataItem is a generic item class, containing an additional description just for more practical reasons. When a user wants to select an existing item, having a description makes it possible to avoid reading the object within the data.
  • The Collection table is just an item with an extra bonus. It can contain multiple child items without the need for any transactions. Actually, this is just a shortcut solution to allow more complex structures within your items. For example, you might create a complete Household collection containing husband, wife, four children and a dog. And although you could link them together by using transactions, having them in a collection just saves the need to create those transactions.
  • DataTransactions is the base class for the transactions, having a sender, receiver and subject item connected together. It also has a link to a rule and a timestamp, indicating when the transaction tool place. (Or will take place for future transactions.)
  • IntegerTransaction is just a basic transaction with a multiplier. This way, you don’t have to add a lot of transactions when your customer buys ten bags of flour.
  • DecimalTransaction is also a basic transaction that will handle items that can be traded in all kinds of different numbers, including fractional amounts. For example, the price of a product, or it’s weight, length or light intensity.
  • DataRule is the basic contract type. It’s a collection of transactions that are all related to one another. For example, the sale of a product would result in a sale rule.
  • The Contract class is more than just a rule. It’s a rule that can contain child rules, thus allowing structured contracts that are made up of several subcontracts. These are used when you have to deal with complex
    situations, like mortgages. A mortgage would include a rule for purchasing a house, a rule for lending money and paying it back, plus other rules for all kinds of insurances.

Now, as I’ve said before, this datamodel should offer me more than enough structural parts to use for my Garage Sale project. All I need to do is compile it and then just leave it alone. There should not be a need to include anything else.

Well, okay… That’s not completely true, since I might want to handle user accounts and store large images of products. But these things would actually require new database structures and should preferably be part of separate databases.

Looking back at this design, it surprises even me how less data it actually has. But the trick here is that I’ve separated the relationships between objects from the actual data itself. Each object can still contain a huge amount of data. But it’s just not important for the model itself.

One thought on “The CART datamodel

  1. Pingback: The challenge for the CART system. | Wim ten Brink

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