Delicious spam!

Once more, a post about spam. Why? Because I have one more interesting email in my spam-box, sent by someone who clearly is confused by the whole topic. So, here’s the email, with some annotations:

spam-1486041897301

Why is it spam? Because Google Apps/GMail says it is. And google is often right in these things. And as I don’t know Adam Collier, nor see any name of his company, it clearly seems like spam to me too, from some wannabe web developer in India looking for customers without understanding the rules.

Why  from India? Well, the English writing is more British than American. The writing style is similar to how Indian spam is generally written, with only single-line paragraphs. The skill set used is also very common among Indian developers. The extreme politeness in the writing also is similar to what you see in mostly Asian countries, as people there are generally more polite. Then of course, it mentions India in the email too so that wasn’t difficult.

First of all, this email was sent from a genuine, free email address like those offered by Outlook, Gmail and Yahoo. I’m not going to say if it’s Outlook or not as I allow this guy some anonymity, even though his name is probably fake and the address already closed for sending spam. But for me that’s the first sign of spam. If it is sent from a free mail provider then you should make sure you know the sender before continuing! As usual, check the sender first for every email you receive!

Next is the address to where it was sent. While it seems to be my “info” account, it just isn’t! It was received by the account I used for my registrar and used in my domain registration where it is visible in the WhoIs information, including my name and some other details. The “info” address happens to be the address of some other website, who has also received this email. My address was actually part of the BCC header so other recipients would not see that I had received it. Smart, but it is to be expected from mass mailers as they would really piss off a lot of people if they only use the TO or CC fields, as many people tend to ‘Reply to all’ on spam messages, making even more spam.

So they got my address from the WhoIs database. So they should have known my name too! They just can’t use it as this is a mass email that’s probably sent to hundreds or even more people.As this spammer doesn’t seem to use any mass mailer application, I suspect that he just collected a lot of email addresses from interesting-looking domains and just mailed to them all from Outlook so the amount of recipients is likely to be hundreds, maybe thousands. Not the millions that more experienced spammers will use.

Interesting is how he’s called a webmanager in his email address while calling himself an online marketing manager in the email. No name for his business so maybe he doesn’t even have a real business. This could be a simple PHP developer who is trying to make a freelance web development business and is hoping to get some customers so he can expand his business. He might have a few friends who are also doing development and likely is a student at Computer Science classes in India who wants to put his lessons to the Test. This doesn’t look like a hardcore spammer, even though he is spamming. He’s more a lightweight spammer.

The prices he mentions are very reasonable. Then again, he basically uses standard frameworks like WordPress, Joomla, Magento and Drupal to build those sites which is generally not too much work. I call these “Do not expect too much from us” prices.

There is one major alert in all this, though. The grey line mentions a “Payment Gateway” which you should immediately distrust! Why? Because this developer is probably setting up this payment gateway and might have control over it later on. He could be siphoning off some of the payments made through it or even at one point empty all the money collected and put it in his own bank account! Good luck getting your money back!

Well, he could be honest but you should not take that risk to begin with…

It is interesting to see that he also provides Android and IOS applications. He seems to be specialized in PHP so he would need to know Swift or Objective-C to do the IOS development and Java for the Android development. Or have some other programming environment that allows him to develop for both platforms. He might be using Visual Studio with Xamarin which would allow him to focus on different platforms. Or he has friends who specialized in app development.

At the bottom of his email he tells you that this isn’t spam and that he actually hates spam. So if you aren’t interested you should just reply to him so he can confirm that your email address exists and is in use so he won’t be sending emails to it. Wait… Why does he need that? People who aren’t interested generally won’t respond! So he might actually be collecting confirmations for other purposes…

Anyways, it shows that many spammers are generally amateurs, not knowing what they’re doing. Some might work for some business and think they can promote it this way while others are just freelance developers trying to find a work in the current market. Both will generally learn that these kinds of emails are spam and generally end up being blacklisted or loose their free email account. The problem is not that they really want to spam people, but they are misguided in thinking that you can just send emails to everyone as part of their marketing strategy!

Unfortunately, it doesn’t work that way! If you send these kinds of messages unsolicited then you are spamming. If you seek new customers then you should start by registering your own domain name and provide proper information about yourself. Use your own domain name for sending emails and not some free provider and more important: use mailer software where people can subscribe and unsubscribe and only mail people who have subscribed! Also provide a simple web-based solution to unsubscribe as a link in your email. People might still consider it spam but at least the risks of being blacklisted becomes less as you’re conforming to the anti-spamming rules.

If you want to do proper business online then you need to be familiar with the rules. You should know about spam and how to avoid to becoming a spammer. You should have a clear profile of your business online, preferably under your own domain name. And you need to know about the legislations of the countries that you’re targeting like the cookie-laws and privacy laws in Europe. Thing is, if your site and services are targeting foreign nations then you are operating under their laws also! Never forget that!

And with that, this lesson ends…Marianne In Office.png